Various Occupations in the Family Tree

Have you ever taken the time to really look at the various occupations in your family Tree?

I was thinking of my own career progression – 20-year career soldier, 10 years in telecommunications, and currently 18 years in public service in the city library.

My father was a salesman, realtor, house parent at a church orphanage and on staff in the Missouri State Prison system. My mother was a school library assistant, bank keypunch operator, and realtor. She worked for the F.B.I. in the fingerprint division between high school and college.

Grandfather Glenn Coleman worked in his father-in-law’s (great-grandfather Henry S. Smiley) general store prior to running his own Coleman Plumbing and Heating business. Grandfather Glen Fugate worked in a chicken hatchery before owning his own Fugate’s Grocery store. His brother, Bill Fugate owned and operated Fugate’s Hatchery all his working life. Uncle (James) Ora Fugate was at various times a schoolteacher, postmaster, and then ran his own home repair shop.

Great-grandfather Will Coleman was a third generation well-digger. Uncle Lloyd Coleman continued the business. Great-grandfather Robert Fugate worked on the railroad, as did one of his brothers (Uncle Will Fugate).

I find that I have a banker, a barber, a carpet layer, a medical doctor, an innkeeper, a jeweler, several lawyers, a funeral director, and a Congressman – Speaker of the House of Representatives – Galusha Aaron Grow, in my family tree.

I traced various lines for my grandson, and he has two distant cousins that were West Point graduates – General U.S. Grant and General Robert E. Lee.

I was not surprised to find several farmers turned soldier during American conflicts – American Revolution, War of 1812, Texas Independence, both Union and Confederate soldiers during the War Between the States, World Wars I & II.

I was a bit surprised in the number of preachers in my tree. I find, Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, Church of Christ, and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints scattered throughout the tree. More than a few changed careers to become Ministers of the Gospel.

There are seamstresses, wheelwrights, bartenders, blacksmiths, waggoneers, boatmen, nurses, sheriffs, tax collectors, and cabinetmakers.

The vast majority of my ancestors were farmers. Today I find only two cousins working their respective family farms.

As you seek out your kindred dead, take a few minutes and review / discover what they did as an occupation. You may find that some of your family trades (or traits or hobbies) coincide with occupations of your ancestors.